28 9 / 2014

sassykardashian:

YOU KNOW WHEN YOU HAVE A LIL CRUSH ON SOMEONE BUT THEN AFTER A FEW DAYS YOU CATCH YOURSELF THINKING ABOUT THEM A LOT AND THAT LIL CRUSH IS NO LONGER A LIL CRUSH IT’S AN ADULT CRUSH AND IT RUINS YOUR LIFE LIKE WTF I DIDN’T SIGN ON FOR THIS

(via hotwaiter)

28 9 / 2014

minimooseontheloose:

When Bucky does finally get introduced to Tony, like “This is Tony Stark, Howard’s kid”, and he goes all sad and quiet, looks at the ground and admits that he killed his parents, I want Tony to just nonchalantly start listing off all of the things that Stark Industries weapons are responsible for, look him in the eye and tell him “we all make mistakes when there’s someone else calling the shots.”

That’s all. 

(via spoopysamwilson)

28 9 / 2014

communistbakery:

astronomers got tired after watching the moon go around the earth for 24 hours so they decided to call it a day

(Source: communistbakery, via cool-story-babe96)

28 9 / 2014

28 9 / 2014

  • 1: -bounces leg-
  • 2: did you know when you bounce your leg like that, it means your anxious or something
  • 1: yeah?
  • 2: you're like always boucing your leg
  • 1: i'm literally always anxious

28 9 / 2014

thecutestofthecute:

BREAKING NEWS!! DOGS IN PAJAMAS I REPEAT, DOGS!! IN. PAJAMAS!!

(via spoopysamwilson)

28 9 / 2014

ladyquintessence:

prismatic-bell:

bamboothief:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.
She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.
"No… They don’t, actually."
"And how do you communicate, then?"
"Talking?"
"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"
"It is, sometimes."
"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.
But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”
It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.
i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.
little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

A day care that I was at for a short time for Uni used to teach kids from about 12 months sign language as a sort of second language (kids sometimes don’t feel like talking or need a way of communicating with other children who are hearing impaired) and I don’t think i once saw parents use it. It wasn’t even hard words or actions it was things like ‘drink’, ‘toilet’, ‘finished’

My aunt is deaf and not only did my grandmother refuse to learn to sign, she insists that Aunt Jan isn’t actually deaf. She’d rather holler at her three times than learn to sign.

Link to Website

ladyquintessence:

prismatic-bell:

bamboothief:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.

She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.

"No… They don’t, actually."

"And how do you communicate, then?"

"Talking?"

"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"

"It is, sometimes."

"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.

But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”

It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.

i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.

little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

A day care that I was at for a short time for Uni used to teach kids from about 12 months sign language as a sort of second language (kids sometimes don’t feel like talking or need a way of communicating with other children who are hearing impaired) and I don’t think i once saw parents use it. It wasn’t even hard words or actions it was things like ‘drink’, ‘toilet’, ‘finished’

My aunt is deaf and not only did my grandmother refuse to learn to sign, she insists that Aunt Jan isn’t actually deaf. She’d rather holler at her three times than learn to sign.

Link to Website

(via prouvaireish)

28 9 / 2014

callmeoutis:

calmb4tehpwn:

rasputinberries:

I love this contest

LAYS MISERABLES
THAT TOOK ME TOO LONG

ok FINE i’ll reblog this one i hope you’re proud of yourselves

callmeoutis:

calmb4tehpwn:

rasputinberries:

I love this contest

LAYS MISERABLES

THAT TOOK ME TOO LONG

ok FINE i’ll reblog this one i hope you’re proud of yourselves

(via spoopysamwilson)

28 9 / 2014

whatasoutherngirlwants:

Oh. My. #pitbull #motherslove

whatasoutherngirlwants:

Oh. My. #pitbull #motherslove

(via spoopysamwilson)

28 9 / 2014

angelclark:

5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

utism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

(via elenaelenamariamaria)

28 9 / 2014

asheathes:

WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: JAPAN

In a secluded area of Mount Hiei, shrouded in mist, the Japanese Institute for Magical Practices spirals gracefully into the sky. The school is a series of elegant pagodas built to impossible heights with a multitude of connecting bridges crisscrossing like a bird’s nest. On the ground is an elaborate garden with a sprinkling of ponds. A kaleidoscope of fish zigzag through the water, sometimes even taking to the air like birds due to rather peculiar abilities gained over time through overexposure to magic. Students often take immense pleasure in enchanting a cherry blossom downpour to trail people who have wronged them; the charm usually remains intact for well over a week unless a teacher takes pity upon the student and dispels the spell. While they have mastered wandless magic through the use of talismans, pockets of the Japanese wizarding community have slowly begun to adopt the use of wands following its rise in popularity all over the world, although wandless magic still takes precedence, and wands are more often tucked behind their ears or used to hold up their hair than to practice magic. 

(via prouvaireish)

28 9 / 2014